Pruning Nectarine Trees

How to Correctly Pruning Nectarine Trees: A Simple Guide

Everyone is familiar with the fruit called nectarine. This is a really delicious fruit. But what about nectarine trees? Before you get ripe and delicious fruit, you need to grow a healthy tree that will bring a good harvest.

Then pruning will be the most important factor that will affect this. In this article, we will describe the correct method of pruning nectarine trees.

Read THIS Before Pruning Your Nectarine Tree

The main factor you should take into account is knowing what hardiness zone you live in. This can help you to know which time of the year is ideal for you to prune the nectarine tree.

Check the picture below.

Pruning Nectarine Trees

Find your hardiness zone HERE

Without this knowledge, you’ll not have more fruits or you will have a dead fruit tree.

How much should I prune nectarine tree?

Ideally, if you want to encourage vegetative growth of the tree and have a healthy growth of the tree in common, healthy and rich harvest perform pruning of the tree every year.

When to prune nectarine trees?

You can choose lat trimming trees in winter, early spring (after the ground has begun to thaw, but before your nectarine tree has buds growing on it), or late summer (after a harvest) to prune your nectarine tree.

10 Effective Tips for Pruning Nectarines

Yes, you already know that pruning the tree is an important process. But what about how to do it correctly? This process can be quite difficult if you do not have the relevant knowledge and at the same time, it will not be difficult for you to do a tree pruning if you are well aware of this issue.

So, catch 10 useful tips that can help you to perform pruning of the tree.

1. Don’t hesitate with nectarine tree pruning

Do not hesitate with pruning the tree, because when you just plant your tree and do the pruning of branches decides whether your tree will be strong and healthy and whether it will bring you good nectarines.

Try to think about the future shape of your tree more when pruning. You may be surprised but when doing this step you are pruning a lot of wood.

Plant growth, fruit growth, and fruit size are determined after this procedure is performed.

2. First you have planted the tree, prune this in winter

It will also be great if you perform pruning of the tree in the first winter after planting it. You will need to leave only those few fruiting wood branches that will really bear nectarine fruit.

3. Prune Every Year

Prune the tree every year during the dormant season, also leaving only those branches that really give the harvest. It helps to be sure that next year’s crop will be healthy and rich.

4. Do not be confused about branches

One of the most important tips is to make sure you prune any branches that are coming off of your Fruiting Wood that does not point outwards. If it points inwards, cut it. If it points out horizontally, cut it.

5. Prune Dead Wood

It is necessary to prune diseased branches, discolored, or dead wood (often without leaves and fruits), as well as areas without bark. Also, an early indication of the ill wood is key. Hardened sap on the wood is the first factor of the ill plant. Start pruning it immediately to prevent your whole plant from death.

6. Prune Suckers

Suckers are real evil for your tree, because they grow from the tree root system, while they do not bear fruit and take away nutrients and water. Get rid of them.

7. Prune Secondary Branches

How to Correctly Pruning Nectarine Trees

Cut off excess secondary branches (every branch that is growing at less than a 45-degree angle) that do not have harvest but only take valuable nutrients from more important main branches.

8. Prune Fruiting Wood

Sometimes it is necessary to prune the branches that give the harvest too if you want to get a rich harvest. Cut off 1/3 or 1/4 from the main branch.

9. Prune Non-Fruiting Wood

Non-fruiting wood is your real enemy. All new growth and new branches must be pruned as well if there is no harvest on them. To help a plant produce more fruit you should leave only those branches that will give the harvest.

Cut it off and don’t regret it!

10. Don’t Forget About Distance

There should be 10-15 inches between your fruit-bearing branches. There shouldn’t be pointing inwards branches or intertwined with each other branches.

Useful Video: How to Correctly Pruning Nectarine Trees

How to Correctly Pruning Nectarine Trees

Now we can share with you detailed instructions on how to prune nectarine trees correctly.

Pruning fruit trees should not be ignored by you. With this procedure, you help the nectarine tree to be strong, healthy, stress-resistant to cold. Also, this procedure is responsible for healthy growth, what the harvest will be, whether the fruits will be large, what their quality will be.

Pruning Nectarine Trees
How to Correctly Pruning Nectarine Trees

So, let’s go.

Tools you’ll need

Obviously, before you start to do the following actions we should say that first, you’ll need to prepare some necessary tools.

– Secateurs to prune small branches

– Pruning saw for larger branches

– Chainsaw for larger branches

– Sharpening tools

– Wire

– Chlorine bleach and water

– Lime sulfur

– Latex paint

– A ladder

Learn how to properly clean your pruners in the video below:

How to Clean and Sharpen Pruning Tools

Disinfect your tools

You may be surprised, but disinfection when pruning the nectarine tree is also an important procedure. It turns out that non-disinfected tools can cause the spread of pathogens and bacteria.

In order to properly disinfect your tools, you will need to create a special solution.

Imagine a liquid in a container.

Divide the entire volume of liquid into 10 parts.

One of these parts should consist of chlorine bleach, and the other nine should be water.

Disinfect your instruments with this solution for 30 minutes.

Then you can proceed to the next step.

Cut the trunk

Look at the top of your plant which is growing from the trunk. Visually imagine or measure how much will be 60-75 cm from the beginning of the top of the plant. Cut it off. It also has a beneficial effect on plant growth, fruit growth, the root system, vegetative growth, and nutrients/water circulation.

Trim the bigger branches

So, you have already correctly performed all the actions listed in the step described above, but what to do next?

And then you will have to pick up the pruner again. Use it and get rid of all small or large branches without regret except for the two main branches. These two branches are the tallest ones growing from the trunk of the tree. They are also called scaffold branches. You have to form a V-shape (also seems like Y-shape) with these scaffold branches.

This procedure helps the tree absorb more sunlight.

Secure the highest branches

Now take the wire. You should use the wire to create a Y-shape between the two highest scaffold branches and the trunk. It helps to keep them stable. At the same time, you need to make sure not to overdo it, otherwise, the overstretched wire will prevent the branch growth.

Do not think that after first pruning you do not need to prune your nectarine tree then. You have to prune young trees mandatory for the first three years after planting.

Now you have to look at your Y-shaped scaffold branches and find the trunk’s extension above. Cut it off and do not forget to hold your tool at a 45-degree. This procedure is necessary if you want to distribute nutrients to its lower parts and encourage vegetative growth.

Then you can wait until January. Then you have to cut back on new branch growth. These are lateral branches that grow out of the scaffold branches. Prune these branches growing from scaffold branches to the collar or base at 45-degree.

Don’t let your tree get sick. You may ask how to determine this? Very easy. The first sign that your tree is starting to get sick is the gumming that appears. They are formed due to the leaking juice. And the juice appears from the damage. Injuries signal illness. Trim the places with gumming.

Cut down the smaller branches

We said above that getting rid of suckers is also an important step on the way to growing a healthy plant. Suckers prevent your nectarine tree from getting all the nutrients and water in full. These small branches grow from the base of the tree but do not have a harvest. You don’t need them, so cut suckers back to the branch collar.

Cut to the branch collar at a 45-degree angle as well.

Actually, you don’t need branches that grow downwards. These branches at first seem to bear fruit, but you will notice that time after time there will be less fruit and the branches will only eat nutrients and water once again, which in turn will not go to the fruit-bearing branches.

You should prune such branches at the point where they tend to grow downwards to encourage horizontal growth and fruit production.

Your plant does not need many small branches that do not have a harvest. In order to determine at the beginning where the fruit will grow and where only the leaves and branches are, pay attention to the buds.

If there are two or three buds in one place, then this indicates that fruits will soon appear in their place, and if you see only one, it will be a leaf or branch that is being born. If you find one bud, cut off the branch heading slightly higher from this bud.

Protect your nectarine tree

You know that despite all the good sides of pruning a tree, this procedure causes a lot of stress to the plant. To protect it from insects and disease, lubricate the trunk with latex paint.

Pruning Nectarine Trees

Final words

Fruit-strewn trees are the dream of every gardener. It is possible to realize it only under the condition of competent and full-fledged care of plantings. Competent pruning of trees is especially important, without which their normal growth and development are impossible. In this case, there is also no need to wait for a plentiful harvest.

Now you know all the details concerning this problem and are also familiar with the detailed instructions on how to prune your nectarine tree.

We hope we helped you. We wish you good harvests!

Trimming Trees in Winter

A Gardener’s Guide to Trimming Trees in Winter

I bet almost all of us are used to the idea of cutting trees in summer, everyone usually imagines a picture of a gardener or a housewife trimming shrubs, but have you heard about trimming trees in winter? You may amazed, but this way of cutting plants has lots of advantages compared to trimming in summer. Pruning trees in winter not only helps remove unsightly dead limbs but also promotes “strong new shoot growth” for better spring bloom, according to the Arbor Day Foundation.

Let’s dive into the topic and learn what pluses and minuses each method of trimming has.

What is the difference between trimming and pruning?

Before we start telling you about differences in the time of cutting trees and shrubs, it is necessary to explain the ways of cutting themselves.

These 2 terms – trimming and pruning – seem to have absolutely the same meanings. However, it is wrong: although the actions are similar, the purpose, the tools, and frequency of procedures are different.

Pruning

Trimming Trees in Winter

Pruning is the process of cutting branches and leaves in order to remove diseased and dead parts of a tree. The tools used for pruning include hand pole saws, shears, and lopping shears. The procedure of pruning is done quite rarely.

Trimming

Trimming Trees in Winter

Trimming is the process of cutting branches and leaves for improving the look of a tree. Trimming is done frequently because leaves and branches grow fast spoiling the general look of a tree all the time. The tools used for trimming include saws, hedge trimmers, and hedge shears.

Benefits Of Trimming Trees In Winter

A more distinguishable tree structure

When leaves fall off deciduous plants, it is much easier to find all the damaged or diseased branches. You don’t have any obstacles on your way to the wood, so you’re able to see all the trunks and branches freely and prune dead and diseased wood fast and easily.

In order for the branches for growing, you need to make the right cuts in the right places to improve the shape and health of your trees.

Dormant pruning doesn’t spread tree diseases

Trimming Trees

Tree diseases are spread by bacteria, parasites, fungi, and insects. Since these microorganisms are dormant in cold temperatures, winter tree work doesn’t allow the diseases to spread further from plant to plant.

There are kinds of trees which have to be cut in the cold time of the year exceptionally. For example, oak and elm can spread oak wilt and Dutch elm disease respectively.

More comfortable process of work

Cold temperatures in winter result in ground freezing. You can take advantage of this fact by bringing heavy equipment and putting it on the hardened ground. This way, you will feel more comfortable while working and accomplish it faster and more effectively than if you stand on an unreliable ladder being afraid of falling down all the time.

In case your region is characterized by warm weather in the winter months or it is late winter or early spring, be careful and check the solidity of the ground. It can happen that there’s a fragile layer of ice which can be ruined under the pressure of your heavy equipment.

Trees have less stress

Usually, when you prune trees damaged or diseased branches, a tree tries to recover and regrow cut branches quite fast filling the appeared gap. However, if you do winter pruning, new growth doesn’t begin until the growing season, i.e. until warmer spring temperatures come.

This fact is also explained by the fact trees need more sunlight, nutrients, and water for healthy growth. So, the effect of dormant pruning keeps for a much longer time than the effect of pruning in spring or summer.

A tree has more time to cure itself till destructive insects appear.

A safer territory for you and your household

Winter pruning may be needed not only for improving the look of trees and shrubs and removing dead and diseased wood. Winter pruning cuts may also be needed for removing dead or dangerous branches and trees which jeopardize all the people going around the yard.

If you have such dangerous branches, don’t delay pruning and warn everybody about the trees and fence the trees. Find out who is responsible for cutting overhanging tree branches.

Advantages and disadvantages of trimming trees during spring and summer

Trimming Trees

Trimming and pruning trees in spring or summer has some pluses and some minuses.

Here’s the list of tree work features which warmer weather brings.

Pluses

  • You can see the tree the whole image of trees including leaves. Though when you prune trees the fact that leaves fall off deciduous plants in autumn is great, when it comes to improving the general look of trees, you definitely need to see the whole tree.
  • Spring and summer change both trees and surrounding conditions. That’s why there are tree works that can be done only in the growing season. For example, it is necessary to trim trees in spring and summer to increase air circulation and provide more sunlight for flower buds, fruit, and berries. When trying to increase air circulation, move from the center to the outside parts of a tree. Don’t get too carried away, remove not more than one-quarter of branches not to cause poor growth of a tree.
  • Early spring-flowering shrubs and trees get some buds before winter comes to begin flowering on time. It is necessary to delay pruning till late spring when these shrub and tree species have finished flowering. In the winter months, you just remove all the flower buds.

Minuses

  • New growth of branches and leaves happens quickly.
  • You don’t see tree structure clearly as you do during winter pruning.
  • Pruning cuts may spread tree diseases since unlike cold-weather warmer weather brings conditions suitable for microorganisms such as destructive insects and bacteria.

video: Trimming Trees in Winter

 

When should you not trim trees?

There’s no concrete time of the year when it is forbidden to prune trees, however, there are phases of particular tree species which don’t assume pruning. For example, early spring-flowering shrubs shouldn’t be cut until they finished flowering.

In conclusion, we wish you good luck with trimming trees in winter if you will consider this way of cutting trees expedient and suitable for you.

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me : Best Christmas Tree Farms

When the wintertime comes and it is really cold and dark outside, it is just necessary to cheer up a little bit and to bring a cozy Christmas atmosphere to the house. The fact you are here means you have googled something like “cut your own Christmas tree farms near me”, so you already know that one of the best ways of spending time in winter is to go to a Christmas tree farm.

Benefits of Visiting a Christmas Tree Farm

There are a lot of benefits which you will get if you come to a Christmas tree farm.

First of all, you will get a great Christmas tree, of course. If you are a decor lover, then we can not continue because to get one of the real Christmas trees as an addition to your decor is a good enough point to go to such a farm.

There are many kinds of Christmas trees (which may be hard to find in the supermarket) such as White Pine, Virginia Pine, Leyland Cypress, Norway Spruce, Scotch Pine… the list is long!

Secondly, you will attend a place filled with Christmas atmosphere, especially if you visit a cut your own Christmas tree farm decorated Christmas style and including different theme facilities.

Thirdly, you will have a great trip with your family, if they want to join you. It becomes more important in winter when there are fewer places to go for a walk. Trip to choose and cut Christmas trees for Christmas may become a nice family tradition.

Imagine how cool it will be to head to a road trip with your family to cut your own Christmas tree and to walk around a farm at Christmas season making memories.

Fourthly, since some of cut your own Christmas tree farms include great Christmas decorations and each of them has lots of Christmas trees as a minimum, visiting a farm is a cool opportunity to do photo ops both just for capturing the moment and for posting beautiful photos on your Facebook page or on Instagram.

Fifthly, you not only get more holiday fun, but you will also get a much more cool alive plant compared to a fake tree not paying a lot. Tree prices start from $30.00.

And did you know that 4th graders can get free Christmas trees?

So, let’s dive into the topic and figure out what Christmas tree farms are situated next to you!

Best Local Christmas Tree Farms {2021}

Christmas Tree Farms in West Michigan that Let You Cut Your Own Christmas Tree

Bivins Tree Farm

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

5085 13 mile road Rockford, MI 49341

U-cut and fresh Pre-cut Fraser Fir Christmas Trees.

U-cut every weekend from 10 am to dusk. Pre-cut any time.

Beautiful Porch Pots, fresh-made wreaths, and porch pot evergreen DIY kits are sold at Bivins Tree Farm.

Bosch’s U Cut Christmas Tree Farm At Country View Nurseries Inc.

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

White Pine, Colorado Blue Spruce, White Spruce, Norway Spruce, Blackhill Spruce, Fraser Fir, Concolor Fir, and Canaan Fir.

Choose & Cut Christmas Trees

The farm is owned by a family.

Church’s Tree Farm 

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

182 136th St., Grant, MI – 231-834-7158

Fraiser Fir, Balsom Fir, & Canaan Fir

Fresh Fraiser Wreaths, Tree Stands and Tree Bags are available.

To get warm, drink a cup of hot cocoa or coffee served in the place.

Hart Tree Farm

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

8760 Young Ave NE Rockford MI 49341

Opens for the 2021 season on Saturday, November 20th.

Balsam Fir, Douglas Fir, Korean Fir, Blue Spruce, & Black Hill Spruce, Concolor Fir, Fraser Fir, Scotch Pine, White Pine.

Choose and cut, and fresh pre-cut trees, wreaths, greens, and garland. 

There’s a possibility to pet farm animals and to have free wagon rides.

Horrocks Christmas Trees

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

3355 Dildine Road, Ionia, MI 48846

Concolor first, Norway Spruce, White Pine, Hinoki Gold Cypress, Weeping White Pine.

Owned and operated by a family.

Choose & Cut and Pre-Cut trees.

There’s a Garden Center filled with many kinds of beautiful plants.

Janke Tree Farm

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

2676 111th Ave. Allegan, MI 49010

Balsam Fir, Canaan Fir, Concolor Fir (White Fir), Fraser Fir, Korean Fir, Norway Spruce (Red Fir), Black Hills Spruce, White Pine.

U-cut and pre-cut Christmas trees.

Enjoy hot chocolate, coffee, and sweets which are available for purchase.

Opening day 2021 is Black Friday – November 26.

Leber Tree Farm

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

2439 36th Street, Allegan MI 49010

Canaan Fir, Fraser Fir, Specialty Firs (Grand & Cork bark) – pre-cuts, Spruce (Blue & Engelmann) – limited pre-cuts.

Owned by a family.

There’s a small gift shop with a great selection of fresh-made wreaths and ornaments available for purchase.

Lenderink Tree Farm

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

401 House St NE, Belmont, MI 49306

White pine, Douglas fir, Blue Spruce, Balsam Fir, Grand fir, Black Hills Spruce, Canaan Fir.

Hot chocolate with marshmallows and coffee are free every day.

On weekends you can sit around a fire pit and have free wagon rides.

Wreaths are also available.

Christmas Tree Farms Near Chattanooga TN And The Surrounding Counties

Mcdowell’s Big Fork Nursery

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

4955 State Highway 27 Chattanooga, TN 37405

Cove Christmas Tree Farm

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

654 Kensington Rd Chickamauga, GA 30707

Family-owned farm.

As you can see from the picture, there’s a cool location for taking photos.

Raulston Acres Christmas Tree Farm

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

2572 GA-95, Rock Springs, GA

An average 6′ tree cost is about $48 (+tax).

Murray Cypress, Blue Ice Cypress, Carolina Sapphire, Virginia Pine, White Pine, pre-cut Fraser Fir, and Green Giant.

Here you can not only buy a pre-cut tree and cut Christmas trees, there’s an opportunity to donate a tree to troops at military bases across the U.S. and in Guam. The farm takes part in the Trees for Troops program founded by Christmas Spirit Foundation. To donate 1 tree costs $30.00.

Campbell’s Christmas Tree Farm

 

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

7503 Walnut Hills Drive, Harrison, TN

Family-owned farm.

Virginia Pine, White Pine, Murray Cypress, Frasier Fir Christmas Trees – precuts.

Wheeler’s Tree Farm

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

1144 Dogwood Valley Road, Tunnel Hill, GA

The farm is also involved in the Trees for Troops program mentioned in the description of Raulston Acres Christmas Tree Farm. Donate a tree to military bases if you wish.

Christmas Carroll Tree Farms

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me
Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

7206 Highway 95, LaFayette, Georgia 30728

Family-owned Christmas tree farm.

Leyland and Murray Cypress, Carolina Sapphire, Fraiser Fir

Santa Land Christmas Tree Farm

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

2574 Concord Road, LaFayette, GA

Family-owned Christmas tree farm.

Santa Land will open this year as usual on Thanksgiving Day, on the 25th of November.

Thornhill Farms Christmas Trees

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

15107 AL-71, Pisgah, AL

Leyland Cyprus, White Pines, Carolina Sapphire, Fraser Firs

You can have a cup of free hot cocoa or hot cider while you wait for your tree to get cut and wrapped.

Moreover, there’s a possibility to go on a wagon ride with your kids, to look at farm animals in the farm zoo, to meet Santa Claus (make sure that Santa visits the farm on the day of your arrival). However, maybe it’s not such a good idea to allow your kid to sit on Santa’s lap because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Little Mountain Tree Farm

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

3186 Griffith Road, Pikeville, TN

White Pine (Eastern White Pine), Norway Spruce, White Spruce, and Colorado Spruce

Young Road Christmas Tree Farm

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

139 Young Rd SW, Cartersville, GA 30120

Owned and operated by a family.

Eastern Red Cedar, Leyland Cypress, Virginia Pine, White Pine, and pre-cut Fraser firs

Open: From The Day After Thanksgiving

Young Road Christmas Tree Farm is the oldest operating Tree Farm in Bartow County.

Coker Tree Farm Georgia

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

2280 Macland Rd, Marietta, GA

Fraser Firs, Murray Cypress, and Carolina Sapphires.

Gates will open at 9 am on November 26th!

Camp’s Christmas Forest

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

415 Kile Rd, Sweetwater, TN

White Pine, Virginia Pine, Scotch Pine, Norway Spruce, Leyland Cypress, Carolina Sapphire Cypress, Murray Cypress.

Opening Day is Black Friday, the 26th of November.

Bluebird Christmas Tree Farm

Cut your own Christmas tree farms near me

985 Brushy Valley Rd, Heiskell, TN

Leyland cypress, Fraser fir, Virginia pine, Norway spruce, Concolor Fir, Nordmann Fir.

You can visit a gift shop and a pavilion to relax in front of a fire, to enjoy a cup of hot chocolate or hot cider, and buy a selection of excellent local jams, honey, and handcrafted items.

Opens for the 2021 season on November 18th. 

How to find a tree farm or lot using the NCTA Real Christmas Tree Locator

How To Pick a Suitable Place For a Christmas tree

If you put your tree at home, make sure that a source of heat is situated far enough from the place meant for the tree. Take into account the height of the tree and the height of your room. The distance between the tree top and the ceiling has to be not less than 1 foot. Most trees have the height between 6 and 9 feet.

If rooms differ by height, maybe you should consider the appropriateness of putting the tree in a higher room or just choose a smaller tree. In case you prefer the second option, don’t forget to measure the tree when you pick it.

How Do I Get Permission To Cut Down Trees?

Nowadays getting a tree cutting permit is possible and available for absolutely everyone!

When the New Year holidays come, you can get permission and cut down the Christmas tree which you like. Your own Christmas tree will bring joy to the whole family!

Obtaining Christmas tree cutting permits on nearby public land can be done through the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) or the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

How To Cut a Tree Correctly

After you choose a perfect tree for you, you need to cut it. But how to do it right so as not to bring inconvenience to Christmas tree farm owners or not to get injured?

First, cut a tree as close to the ground as possible. This way, you don’t leave a big stump on a territory of a farm and don’t make your tree too short. In case you think it will be hard for you to cut your own tree, either ask a worker to do it or get a pre-cut tree instead.

After you (or workers) cut your own Christmas tree, the workers shake the tree properly in order to remove all the ground and dirt that could appear at your home. Then your perfect Christmas tree is wrapped up in paper for a further successful trip home.

Transportation Of a Tree

Consider the most convenient way of transportation. Bring a truck if possible, as well as twine, rope, or straps for tying down your tree. The busiest time is when the gates open, so do expect a line for entrance due to limited parking! The line is usually better about 1-2 hours after gates open. Bathroom and portable potty available.

If you’re going to transport a tree with the help of the car, compare the size of the tree and the size of the car.

How To Install a Christmas Tree On a Tree Stand

A convenient way to install a Christmas tree is to buy a base on 1 of the local Christmas tree farms and to use it as a tree stand drilling holes in the tree preliminarily right on the Christmas tree farm. It is better to ask workers to help you drill these holes to be sure in the result.

How To Keep Christmas Trees Alive

Now when you know the answer to the question “What is the best cut your own Christmas tree farms near me?”, you need to learn how to treat a Christmas tree so it doesn’t die for some reason.

The first rule says that you should cut approximately 1 inch of the tree bottom with a handsaw. It is necessary to provide better absorption of water by Christmas trees. Otherwise, after some time since the cut a tree sap crusts over the tree bottom, so it becomes impossible to get nutrition for the tree and it dies. Take into account that even in case your trip is not really long, a tree sap forms anyway.

Fill the tree base with 1 and a half gallons of water and keep this amount constant. Such a big amount is needed to guarantee the presence of water in the base. If there’s not enough water, the tree begins to wither.

As for your safety, we advise you to apply only tested and reliable lights for Christmas trees decoration.

Overall

To sum up, one of the best activities to do during the holiday season is to head to a U Cut Christmas tree farm to cut your own tree (or to choose one from pre-cut Christmas trees).

We hope you managed to find Christmas tree farms which suit you.

Tree stump removal near me

Tree stump removal near me & Price Guide

An ugly tree stump is evil in your yard. It would seem that it was very difficult for you to cut down a tree, but here’s the bad luck – a stump remained after it.

What should I do with it? How to remove it? Tree stump removal near me.

We will answer these and many of your questions below in the article.

Tree Stump Removal Near Me

Stump removal cost is a difficult issue. It is impossible to say exactly how much it will cost to remove a tree stump. The price is influenced by many factors. One of them, as you may have guessed, is, of course, the stump size.

We can say that to remove a tree stump approximately you will need from $60 to $350 dollars. On average, $2-$3 dollars is the cost of removal per stump diameter. Self-removal of a stump will deduct from your budget from $75 to $150.

Tree stump removal near me

Tree Stump Removal Cost & Price Guide

Considering the issue in more detail, let’s still understand the prices for stump removal, and also discuss the factors affecting the stump removal process.

There are many small aspects that affect the cost.

Tree stump removal near me

The average stump removal costs are:

– Typical price range = $60-$350 per stump

– Average cost = $2-$3 per inch of diameter

– Best/cheapest price = $75-$150 (renting, DIY)

Tree Stump Removal Cost

The time spent on the stump removal, as well as the size of the stump, are the most important factors on the basis of which you will be charged for the work.

For example, if you have a very huge and hard-to-remove stump in your yard, then you can be charged as much as $300 for it.

The national average price for professional stump removal requested by a professional tree service company is around $165. Most often it takes about an hour to work. Here are the reasons why the price requested by a professional service may be overstated or understated.

– Removing the diameter of the stump will cost you $ 2 or $3 but be prepared for the fact that most often stump removal companies charge $ 100 for the work at once.

– Very often it happens that the company offers to remove the first stump for one price, and the second at a discount cost.

Example: First stump – $100-$150; some follow – up – 30$-50$.

Tree stump removal near me

Tree Stump Removal Cost per hour

It is also common for customers to have a whole yard with stumps of various sizes. In such cases, an hourly fee is usually charged. It is around $150 per hour.

What affects how much the Cost of Stump Removal will be?

Tree stump removal near me

There are some reasons below:

– stump size,

– tree age,

– soil type,

– tree type,

– stump health,

– root system size, depth, and width,

– number of stumps.

Is Stump Removal Cheaper than Tree Removal?

Tree removal cost starts at $345 and range, right up to $1,500, so it is more expensive than stump removal.

Tree stump removal near me

DIY Tree Stump Removal Cost

DIY stump removal has an average cost of about $100. At the same time, the work will take three times longer.

Special equipment is rented for DIY stump removal. There are hydraulic tree stump grinders. It is important to remember that renting such equipment will be expensive ($100-$400) and will also require a lot of effort to transport it to your home.

Tree Stump Grinding

Tree stump removal near me

Such equipment may not always be really necessary in this case. In fact, if you do not know how to use it and do not know where it is appropriate for use, then it is better to pay a specialist the same amount than to mess around yourself and screw everything up.

Chemical Rotting

Tree stump removal near me

Chemical rotting is the cheapest and easiest way to remove a stump. Chemical rotting will soften the stump within a few weeks thanks to the added potassium nitrate, which costs only $6.

Of course, you can also hire a professional for $100 to do everything exactly right.

Also, do not forget that animals and children should not be allowed near chemicals.

The Limitations of Tree Stump Removal Yourself

The equipment, thanks to which the stump removal procedure can be carried out independently, is most often used if you need to get rid of a lot of small stumps.

If you have one huge stump, it would be wiser to hire a professional.

DIY Stump Removal vs Professional Stump Removal

We recommend resorting to professional stump removal, as this will be a more reasonable solution. These people know everything about stumps removals, while you (most often) will not know how to approach this issue correctly. Hiring a specialist is much more efficient. This will help save time and effort, as well as nerves spent trying to figure out the issue.

Professional Stump Removal Costs

Tree stump removal near me

The average cost, if you hired a professional, will be about $165. By providing tree cutting services, Companies can provide services for the removal of stumps of various costs..

Often these tree stump removal services use special equipment like stump grinders to do the removal of multiple stumps or something else to do their job more efficiently and fast. In this case, professional stump removal cost will be more expensive but you won’t regret a single dollar spent.

There are several reasons how companies calculate the price.

Size

To calculate the price, the worker will have to measure the stump size.

Total Number of Stumps

Often, if you need to remove more than one stump, you can get various discounts.

Small Stumps vs. Large Stumps

It is logical that small stumps are easier to remove. Accordingly, the stump removal cost will be less, but if the stump turns out to be very large, then the worker will put more effort and time to remove it.

Geographic Location

There is such a pattern that in less densely populated cities the cost tree service companies offer will be less than in large cities. Transport costs also matter.

Type of Tree

Since most professionals charge per diameter inch or per stump, regardless of the tree type.

Most often, the tree type does not matter when it comes to price. Many specialists use a stump grinder for tree stumps removals, and this equipment can grind any tree type.

For a stump grinding, it doesn’t matter what tree type of stump you have. You can usually grind anything with the help of special equipment. However, the tree type matters if the root system of a particular tree will be difficult to remove. In this case, the worker will need to put more time and effort into completing his task.

In this case, you will need to talk to the worker about the stump removal cost in advance.

Clearing Land

There are cases in which the owner is faced with a task when he needs to clear a whole area of stumps. Then the worker will calculate the hourly wage based on the average diameter of the stumps.

What factors determine what the Tree Stump Removal Cost will be?

Tree stump removal near me

Stump Diameter

– Obviously, the amount of work is primarily calculated based on the size of the stump. A small stump is a small cost, a large and hard-to-remove stump is a large cost.

Age of Stump

– Stumps that are already old usually rot completely and their grinding is easy and fast. This factor also affects the price.

Soil Condition

– Rocky soil poses a threat to the equipment. It may be damaged. For this reason, you can expect to be asked for an additional payment.

Type of Tree Stump

– We explained above that some tree stumps may be harder to grind.

Root System

– Of course, it’s usually easier to cut down what’s above ground. The most difficult task is to remove the root system, which goes deep into the earth. The more complicated it is, the more the work will cost.

Cleanup

– A worker can simply perform stump removal, or he can also clean up everything behind him. Certainly, you will have to pay extra for cleaning.

Stump Removal – Is it a Necessity or a Choice?

What Dangers will arise if I don’t Remove Tree Stump?

Stumps can create new tree growth. 

Tree roots have a huge impact. If you do not take care of the complete removal of the tree stump with the roots, new growth of the tree may begin, which will create a danger to your pipes.

Stumps can rot. 

The rotting of a tree stump is a normal biological process. But that’s exactly dangerous for humans. This process can attract pests and insects that can be harmful to a person and his property and simply annoy and overshadow his stay at home.

Stumps are ugly. 

Can anyone really think that sticking out bare stumps is beautiful? Of course not, especially if these stumps are also rotting. Let’s admit honestly that they are ugly and this may be the main reason to consider removing them.

Stumps take up space. 

Tree stumps take up a lot of free space. You never know when it will occur to you to install an above-ground swimming pool in your yard, and your yard is occupied by stumps. Agree that this is a huge inconvenience.

Having just a smoothed space or a beautiful lawn is the dream of any homeowner. Therefore, we advise you to start removing your stumps as soon as possible.

Stumps can be dangerous. 

The stump automatically becomes a danger to, for example, your child who is playing in the backyard. Children often like to run, and the stump, especially the one that sticks out low above the ground is very difficult to notice. And adults can’t always notice an interfering thing sticking out under their feet.

So yes, it’s really traumatic.

Conclusion

It’s time to bring our article to a conclusion. We hope that now you will be full of knowledge that will be useful to you in solving your question. Now you all know about the removal of the stump prices, the pros, and cons of DIY and professional removal.

In conclusion, we could only add a few more tips thanks to which you will be able to choose the right specialists and not meet scammers.

Never consider hiring companies that offer their services at too low prices. It is better to start reading reviews, looking for companies that are crystal clear and frank with customers, than to choose a dubious company that can bring you risks and you will waste your money. A miser pays twice.

There are many excellent companies that can offer their services at an average, but not overpriced or undervalued price. Also, try to find out the price for services from several companies that have inspired you with confidence. So you can choose the most suitable company for yourself both in price and quality.

We hope our article was useful for you and helped you save money, energy, time, and nerves.

Tree Root Removal Under Concrete

Tree root removal under concrete – 6 cases when you need to remove the roots

Do you want to create a lovely yard, but planted trees have too many roots which break the sidewalk or even cause foundation problems? Fortunately, there’s a way out. The article tells you about tree root removal under concrete.

 Methods of tree root removal under concrete

Tree Root Removal Under Concrete

1. You must ensure that the stump is removed since, in most situations, the tree’s roots will regrow if you do not. It’s easy to get rid of it by shredding it. Shred the tree stump to a depth of 12 inches to ensure that the whole stump is removed. Plant the stump as soon as possible after shredding it.

2. Hire a concrete contractor if removal isn’t a possibility. Concrete contractors (or one contractor) you choose will have a significant influence on the outcome of your sidewalk repair or replacement.

The following are some good methods:

Place a layer of gravel beneath the new concrete for root growth.

Reinforce the concrete with rebar so that the roots have to lift many concrete sidewalk slabs at the same time to cause any damage to happen.

To give the tree’s trunk and roots freedom to develop, build a pathway that curves or slopes around it.

Can you cover tree roots with concrete?

You are free to do so, but it’s bad for the tree so don’t. Concrete-encased tree roots are unable to absorb water, oxygen, or nutrients. Professional concrete workers, on the other hand, rarely pour concrete straight on bare ground or roots.

There isn’t much that can be done if the concrete was put right on the earth and tree roots. The concrete should be removed and a sturdy pavement built in its place. This should ideally not be done at the tree’s root zone. Even if the damage has already happened, be sure to remove the concrete from the tree roots.

You can place the concrete near the tree as long as you leave adequate space for tree root growth and the tree’s nutrient supply is not harmed.

How do you cut tree roots under pavers?

Tree Root Removal Under Concrete

1. Remove all paving stones affected by the tree roots and enough rows to allow good access to the soil around the problem roots. Pry the paving stones from their substrate with your gloved hands, a spade, or a pry bar.

2. Number the pavers with chalk, if necessary, so you can replace them in a specific pattern. Place the pavers in a location where they will be protected from damage.

3. Dig out around the roots and remove the substrate from under the pavers and the soil around the roots. Remove enough soil to expose and clearly see the entire section of the tree root system you want to remove.

4. Cleanly sever the unwanted roots with a sharp cutting tool. A spade can be used to cut through small roots less than 1/2 inch in diameter, loppers can be used to cut through roots up to 3/4 inch thick, and a small ax is best for larger diameter roots.

5. Pull all root sections out of the soil and discard them. Make sure that the remaining roots all fall below the surrounding soil surface.

6. Backfill the excavated area with the previously removed topsoil to level the area with the surrounding soil.

7. Cover the soil with a layer of the substrate you will use to lay the pavers, usually gravel or sand, and level it to a smooth surface.

8. Lay the pavers in the desired location and tamp them down with the wooden handle of your spade or a rubber mallet.

9. Brush or wash off any chalk marks on the pavers and fill in the spaces with the remaining sand or aggregate, if applicable to your installation.

VIDEO:

What to do when your tree’s root growth is destroying the sidewalk

Tree Root Removal Under Concrete

Move the repaired sidewalk a few feet away from the tree, ideally outside the root plate, i.e. at a distance equal to three times the tree’s diameter.

Excavate beneath the offending roots:

Instead of cutting the roots that have elevated the sidewalk, leave the root intact and remove the dirt beneath the root with an air excavator such as an Air Spade or an Air Knife.

This space under the root can be left open or filled with clean gravel that will be pushed out of the way as the root develops lower. The root should spread downward and fill the space as you replace the asphalt sidewalk above it. This approach should be used in conjunction with reinforced sidewalks and other possible solutions.

Use thicker concrete:

If you increase its thickness from 4 inches to 6 inches, the sidewalk is less likely to crack or lift. This technique should be used in conjunction with the reinforced concrete technique described above for best results. Research is currently being conducted to determine the best concrete thickness. However, no data is available at this time.

Place the sidewalk over a flowers and gravel area:

Recent research on roots and sidewalks has shown that a geogrid placed on the roots spreads the force of the upward pressure of the roots over a large area. If we then cover the geogrid at least 3 to 4 inches deep with clean #57 stone, the concrete sidewalk can be poured onto the stone.

The stone should be covered with a geotextile fabric to prevent sand and soil from penetrating the stones. The stones provide a partially flexible buffer that distributes the force of the lifting roots to the concrete sidewalk slabs above. This arrangement may result in the sidewalk being higher than the original sidewalk.

Place clean gravel under the sidewalk:

Recent research has shown that simply placing clean gravel under a sidewalk slab will make roots spread under the crumbly material rather than directly under the concrete slab. The large air spaces in the material make the roots grow under the foundation.

Consequently, the sidewalk is less likely to be pushed up by the roots.

Rubber sidewalks and pavers:

Rubber sidewalks, other flexible materials, and pavers make it possible to reduce repair costs by removing and replacing a root-damaged section of the sidewalk. However, the repair often requires cutting roots that are raising the sidewalk.

However, these materials do not solve the problem of what to do with a large tree root that is increasing in diameter. Other options may be needed to accommodate the large roots rather than cutting them.

How to stop tree root systems from damaging sidewalks

Start by planting the tree right from the beginning!

Tree Root Removal Under Concrete

Tree roots are not only the foundation of a tree but also a transport system that brings water and nutrients to the interior of the tree. They extend about a foot to a foot and a half out from the trunk for every measured inch of trunk diameter, or about a foot above the ground.

So a tree 12 inches in diameter has roots that extend 12 to 15 feet in every direction! Imagine trees in a forest that are of different heights and widths, and imagine the intersections and the extent of tree roots!

Now imagine your apartment block and the potential impact on your sidewalk. Those roots are looking for water. Not that you want to suppress growth, but you can water longer and less frequently so that the water penetrates deeper into the soil rather than just hitting the surface layer.

In the first few years of a tree’s growth, water the roots deeply to encourage growth and good health. Watering more slowly will help the water penetrate deeper into the tree roots.

Once a tree is about two to three years old, you should also prune it while maintaining good watering. Pruning back branches that are not thriving or growing into the street is a necessary action. You can train the tree to some degree to redirect its growth path. You may need to obtain a permit from the city to trim street trees.

Trees planted along the sidewalk often require root pruning in conjunction with sidewalk replacement and other street improvement projects. Some tree species that tolerate root damage better are Norway maple, ginkgo, hackberry, hawthorn, cherry, and river birch.

Trees that grow more slowly are also potentially less damaging to sidewalks. Some of these trees are known to grow taller, but we will consider the width of your sidewalk, distance from the street, power lines, and house to make the most important recommendation.

Since removing trees defeats the purpose of careful planning when planting a tree and may need to comply with local ordinances, it is important to take all possible precautions in advance.

While it may sound counterproductive to put a hump in the sidewalk, it is one way to avoid tree damage. The practice of pouring concrete over the damaged portion is called “bridging.”

This is often necessary when the roots are too large to cut and are now pushing up the original sidewalk. Another interpretation is more literal: you would actually build a bridge over the protruding tree roots.

Landscape pavers can also be used in these circumstances. Even though they are a different material, these stones can be adjusted to allow the roots to recede as they expand without damaging the entire sidewalk or requiring work.

There are a few other ways concrete can help keep your sidewalk from being damaged by trees.

Gravel can be placed under the sidewalk slabs to create air spaces between the soil and the sidewalk and to escape pushing up the slab in the process of root growth. This is not a foolproof method, but studies have found great success with this method. Pouring a thicker concrete slab can also prevent root systems from breaking through the slab.

A standard thickness is 4 inches, but increasing the depth to 6 inches can be a solution. If the roots begin to lift the sidewalk, it can be removed to level the surface again. Also, if the tree starts to push up the sidewalk again, this should give you several much-needed times to do pruning.

Also, using concrete reinforced with rebar or wire mesh will make the sidewalk more stable.

Options for sidewalk repair around existing tree species

1. Shaving the top of the concrete or installing a ramp to even the surface and reduce the tripping hazard

2. Increasing the distance from the tree to the edge of the sidewalk.

3. Bridging the pavement over the tree’s roots.

4. Replacing concrete with interlocking paver blocks or rubber pavers.

5. Root shaving then installing new concrete.

6. Root removal and lifted sidewalks replacement.

Overall

You should plant trees in the right spots so the tree will be protected whenever possible, tree roots are a very important part of a tree. Planning ahead and planting trees in proper good spaces will save you time in the future. If you plant a tree in a good spot, there will be no issues.

Resources for solving problems with the roots of sidewalks and trees

 Dr. Ed Gilman, Trees for Urban and Suburban Landscape, Delmar, New York, 1996.

John Roberts, Nick Jackson and Mark Smith, Tree Roots in Built Environment, Center for Ecology and Hydrology, Environmental Research Council, London, 2006.

Smiley, Thomas, Bruce Fredrich, Neil Hendrickson, Ph.D., Tree Risk Management, Bartlett Tree Research Laboratories), Charlotte, NC, 2002.

Dr. L. Costello and Dr. C.S. Jones, Reducing Tree Root Damage to Infrastructure: A Compendium of Strategies, International Forestry Society Western Branch, Cohassit, California, 2003.

Dr. Ed Gilman’s website http://hort.ufl.edu/woody/urbansidewalk.shtml (accessed June 29, 2011)